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Do I need planning permission?

You’ll probably need planning permission if you want to:

  • build something new
  • make a major change to your dwelling, for example building an extension
  • change the use of your building
  • make external changes to a flat or maisonette
  • make alterations to a dwelling in Kendal's 'Article 4 Directions' conservation area
  • make external alterations to a commercial building

There are some other things you'll need to check to help you decide if you need to make a planning application:

Step by step checklist

  1. Check if your project is a 'permitted development' and exempt from planning permission
  2. Check if your project is in our planning area
  3. Check if your project is in Kendal's 'Article 4 Directions' conservation area 
  4. Check If your project needs planning permission on the Planning Portal website
  5. Check if you need a 'Lawful Development Certificate for proposed works'
  6. Make a planning application

Step 1 - Check if your project is a 'permitted development'

From the 6 April 2016 there were changes to Permitted Development Rights, including amendments to changes of use to dwelling houses.

Find out more, regulations relating to the 2016 amendments to the Town and Country Planning Act.

For a period of six years, between 30 May 2013 and 30 May 2019, householders will be able to build larger single-storey rear extensions under permitted development.

Notification for prior approval for a proposed large home extension form and guidance (PDF 235KB / 3 pages)

Technical guidance on householder permitted development.

Step 2 - Check your planning area

Large parts of South Lakeland District Council's area are covered by national parks, which have their own planning authorities.

If your development is in a national park then you will need to apply to the park's planning teams, not to us at SLDC:

Find out if your development is in a national park.

  1. When the map opens you will see the national parks marked, Green for the Lake District and Blue for the Yorkshire Dales.
  2. In the 'Current Address' field, at the top of the map, enter the address details of the property you want to look at.
  3. The map will zoom in on the property and mark it with a 'target' icon.
  4. Zoom out on the map using your mouse (or the scrolling tool in the top left hand corner of the map) to see where the property is in relation to the national parks.

Step 3 - Check if your project is in Kendal Conservation Area

Dwellings within the Kendal conservation area are subject to tighter controls than elsewhere. These controls are called Article 4 Directions.

An Article 4 Direction covers most of the Kendal conservation area. Dwellings within the other conservation areas in our district are not subject to Article 4 Directions.

This means most alterations (including replacement window frames, doors, garden walls, railings, guttering and pathways) at the front of houses in the Kendal Article 4 Directions area, require planning permission.

You will need to complete a Householder Application Form:

Find out if your development is in an area covered by Kendal's 'Article 4 Directions'

  1. When the map opens you will see the Kendal 'Article 4 Directions' boundary marked by a black line.
  2. In the 'Current Address' field, at the top of the map, enter the address details of the property you want to look at.
  3. The map will zoom in on the property and mark it with a 'target' icon.
  4. Zoom out on the map using your mouse (or the scrolling tool in the top left hand corner of the map) to see where the property is in relation to the Kendal Article 4 Direction area.

Step 4 - Check the Planning Portal Website

To help you find out whether you need planning permission you can use the "Do you need permission?" and "Interactive House" guidance and tools available on the Planning Portal website.

https://www.planningportal.co.uk/info/200125/do_you_need_permissionhttps://www.planningportal.co.uk/info/200125/do_you_need_permission/90/interactive_house

Step 5 - Check if you need a 'Lawful Development Certificate for Proposed Works'

If you want to be certain that the work you want to carry out does not need planning permission, you can apply for a 'Lawful Development Certificate for Proposed Works' (LDC).

It’s not compulsory but may be useful if you ever need to confirm that works are lawful under planning legislation.

Apply for an LDC:

Planning Portal online LDC application service

or make a paper based LDC application.

Step 6 - Make a planning application with SLDC

If you think your project needs planning permission you can follow our guide to Making a Application.

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