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Protected species

When is information on protected species required?

Proposals which include work such as the demolition of older buildings or roof spaces, removal of trees, scrub, hedgerows or alterations to watercourses may affect protected species.

These proposals must be accompanied by information on protected species, any potential impacts for them and any mitigation proposals.

What information should I provide on protected species?

Plans should show any significant wildlife habitats or features and the location of habitats of any species protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, Conservation (natural habitats etc) regulations 1994 or protection of badgers act 1992. 

The most common protected species found in South Lakeland are bats, Barn Owls, badgers, Great Crested Newts, crayfish and Natterjack Toads. More specific information on bats is listed below.

Further Guidance

Natural England has produced advice notes and mitigation guidelines on individual protected species.

Bats and their roosts are protected by law. Bats and the Law.

When is a bat survey required?

Bat surveys will be needed for any application that relates to traditional older rural buildings for example barns. When planning a development check for the presence of bats as early as possible so that any planning and licensing issues can be addressed.

Planning authorities have to take account of the presence of protected species, including bats, when considering applications for planning permission. We may refuse applications on the grounds of adverse effects on these species.

Any proposal that may affect bats must be accompanied by an up to date bat survey.

If the study or assessment is deemed to be inadequate then permission may be refused.

Guidance

General guidance on bats can be viewed on both the bat conservation trust and the Defra.

Mitigation measures

Mitigating measures can include the timing of building works, the protection of the exiting roost or the creation of a new roost.

English Nature have produced  bat mitigation guidelines and also the  guidance on protecting bats and owls when renovating old buildings.

Reporting the presence of bats

If you have found a bat within your building then you should report it to the bat conservation trust.

Plans should show any significant wildlife habitats or features and the location of habitats of any species protected under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. Conservation (natural habitats etc) regaulations 1994 or protection of badgers act 1992.

Applications for development in the countryside that will affect sensitive areas must be accompanied by ecological assessments and include proposals for long-term maintenance and management.

This information might be included in an environment statement, if one is needed.